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The Benefits of Entering the Construction Industry After High School Part 2

College isn’t for everyone. Today’s job market is making it difficult for college graduates to find work in their field of study, and the rising cost of education is plaguing students with debt that can take years to pay off. On the other hand, the construction industry is eager to hire young workers looking to jumpstart their careers early.

In part one of this two-part guide, the Houston construction law attorneys at Cotney Construction Law examined the availability of jobs in construction and the competitive pay offered by these positions. In part two, we will discuss opportunities for advancement, the importance of construction, and the opportunities for travel that exist in the construction industry.

Lifelong Career

The construction industry is one of the most stable cornerstones of the U.S. economy. Whether erecting the newest skyscraper in New York City or repairing our country’s worn down infrastructure, there will always be a need for construction workers. More importantly, there will always be opportunities to climb the ladder and advance your career within the construction industry.

Depending on your skills and interests, you may find yourself taking on a leadership role as a foreman or supervisor as you climb the ladder from entry-level worker to the next echelon of employment opportunities. With continued training, you can specialize and become an engineer, health and safety expert, or a trainer. Some people even spearhead their own construction firms and enter the fray as independent contractors. The possibilities are virtually endless.

Important, Wholesome Work

Working in construction also allows you to touch the lives of countless others. Building homes for people who need shelter, or offices for companies with plans to usher in the next wave of sustainability, means you have a direct hand in improving the lives of others. Crossing a bridge you helped construct on the way to a job site proves that you left a tangible impression on the world and touched the lives of countless people. In most cases, your work will be around long after you are gone. Helping bring something new and beneficial into existence is a unique feeling that construction workers experience regularly.

Travel Opportunities

One of the lesser-known facts about the construction industry is that travel opportunities exist for those willing to chase large-scale projects, especially those focused around natural resources. If you’ve been looking for a way to travel the country and experience the natural splendor of the United States, a career in construction may be worth your consideration. Traveling allows you to expand your impact on the country’s infrastructure and development, and traveling workers usually earn more than their centralized counterparts.

If you would like to speak with a Houston construction law attorney, please contact us today.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is for general educational information only. This information does not constitute legal advice, is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor should it be relied upon as legal advice for your specific factual pattern or situation.

The construction industry is currently facing a catastrophic labor shortage. With an abundance of jobs that pay well and offer ample opportunities for advancement, a career in construction is something all high school graduates should consider before settling into a multi-year commitment with an academic institute.

Choosing to forego the path of academia in pursuit of valuable, high-demand trade skills is a respectable decision that can put you on the fast track toward financial freedom. In part one of this two-part guide, the Houston contractor attorneys at Cotney Construction Law will review the benefits of entering the construction industry after high school. If you’ve never considered a career in construction, you might be surprised by the immense upside to relocating your talents to the job site.

Plenty of Jobs

One of the biggest fears facing college students is the uncertainty of job placement after graduation. A college degree doesn’t guarantee you a job, and the rising cost of education means earning a college degree requires you to take a major risk on your future. Conversely, the construction industry is facing a labor shortage that all but guarantees employment. Spending four years paying out of pocket for higher education doesn’t seem logical if you can’t land a sensible position after graduation.

Jobs in construction are unlikely to reach capacity anytime soon. It is estimated that over the next ten years, roughly 250,000 baby boomers will hang up their hard hats for good and retire from the construction industry. Employers will be aggressively searching for intelligent, well-rounded individuals to fill these positions.

Competitive Pay

The median yearly income for construction workers in the U.S. was $33,430 in 2016. Although this may seem low, when comparing it to entry-level jobs that require a college degree, construction workers actually earn more on average. Plus, construction workers in the 75th percentile earn nearly 1.5 times this amount.

A career in construction allows you to start earning money today, without the looming burden of student loans. The wage outlook in construction is positive, and salaries have steadily increased over the last decade. Location plays a large role in salary, too. Hawaii ($56,180), Illinois ($56,180), Massachusetts ($53,750), New Jersey ($50,030) and Alaska ($49,680) paid construction workers the highest mean salary in the country in 2016.

Keep in mind that these numbers reflect an entry-level career in construction. Carpenters, steelworkers, cost estimators, and construction managers all earned between $40,000 and $100,000 on average.

In part two, we will examine how a career in construction can help you achieve lifelong employment, assist others, and even travel the country.

If you would like to speak with a Houston contractor attorney, please contact us today.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is for general educational information only. This information does not constitute legal advice, is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor should it be relied upon as legal advice for your specific factual pattern or situation.

The relationship between millennials and the construction industry reveals an interesting dynamic. Although millennials are largely absent from the construction industry’s job market, their buying behavior and latent talents have the ability to influence the construction industry in substantial ways.

In part one of this two-part series, the Houston construction lawyers at Cotney Construction Law explored the relationship between millennial spending habits and the construction industry. In this installment, we will take a look at various ways to attract millennials to jobs in the construction industry.

Millennials in Construction

Millennial buying habits are only one aspect of the impact of millennials on the construction industry. The frequently discussed labor shortage in the construction industry can be partially attributed to the lack of millennial interest in construction jobs. Why are millennials apathetic towards construction jobs that often offer superior wages to entry-level positions in the college graduate job market? Millennials have grown up in an age of technology and glamour.

The increased usage of technology and digital platforms has resulted in a paradigm shift in the job market. Millennials want to work in tech-savvy industries that help them cultivate skills they view as vital in the world they grew up in. Ironically, technology is beginning to play a major role in the construction industry. Communicating the varied applications of technologies, like virtual reality and augmented reality, in the construction industry will help attract millennials to construction jobs. Pitching innovation to millennials will help ease the current labor shortage.

Incorporating Mobile

Construction companies that are willing to invest in new technologies are essentially re-branding for millennials while opening the door for innovative, cost-effective processes that can alter workflow in unique ways. Millennials are always on their phones because their phones are a portal to the world beyond their physical space. Mobile tools have the potential to change the way we approach construction, but construction companies have been sluggish to adapt new mobile-focused technologies.

Mobile technology makes your company appear more technologically advanced and it increases productivity. Workers can use smartphones to take photos of construction-related problems and quickly disseminate the information to the rest of the team. Mobile ERP apps allow workers to access project data and monitor project progress.

The millennial impact on the construction industry can’t be overstated. Millennial behavior as buyers and job seekers greatly affects the construction industry. Although the construction industry has remained a relatively stable cornerstone of the U.S. economy for years, a lack of innovation and a failure to embrace new ideologies has resulted in considerable growing pains.

If you would like to speak with a Houston construction lawyer, please contact us today.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is for general educational information only. This information does not constitute legal advice, is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor should it be relied upon as legal advice for your specific factual pattern or situation.

Millennials present a unique lineup of opportunities and challenges for industries that have largely remained the same over the last half-century. Millennials are often viewed as agents of change who disrupt the status quo and aim to alter tried-and-true trends in consumerism and employment.

The inclusion of millennials in the economy can be polarizing, especially in the construction industry. Millenials are seen as energetic and innovative individuals who prefer cerebral problem-solving in lieu of getting their hands dirty. Will millennials usher the construction industry into the future, or complicate an industry that has remained stable for decades? In this two-part guide, our Houston construction attorneys will attempt to answer this important question.

Millennial Spending

Millennials are often defined as adults between the ages of 20 and 35. Most millennials are just beginning to reach the age where purchasing a house is becoming a reality. However, not all millennials plan on buying houses like their parents. Pandemic wanderlust has shifted the classic ideology of homeownership in favor of year-to-year rentals that allow millennials to focus on traveling in an attempt to foster a more comprehensive worldview. Opportunity in the global economy moves swiftly, and millennials move with it.

This trend, combined with a shortage of salary jobs for college graduates, has resulted in an increased need for affordable rental housing. Millennials who grew up in households plagued by debt have a tendency to be debt-averse. Therefore, millennials are less likely to make large purchases, such as houses and automobiles, that require long-term commitments millennials perceive as debt.

Reduced Profit Margins

It’s not that millennials don’t want to buy homes, they just want to wait for the ideal time to purchase their first home. Homeownership is still valued. It is viewed as a rite of passage into adulthood and the first step in settling down to start a family. Unfortunately, most millennials face significant financial barriers that bar them from purchasing homes. Student loans, low wages, and rising house prices are a triple threat facing most millennials.

The lack of “starter homes”, houses that are smaller and less expensive, has made it difficult for millennials to purchase their first home. One challenge facing the construction industry is the reduced profit margins associated with catering to millennial needs. The market for starter homes is booming, but if cost-efficient housing results in paltry profits, the construction industry and millennials will be locked in a stalemate until wages increase or the cost of construction decreases.

In part two of this two-part guide, our Houston construction attorneys will discuss the case for millennials working in construction and the role of mobile technology in attracting millennials workers.

If you would like to speak with a Houston construction attorney, please contact us today.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is for general educational information only. This information does not constitute legal advice, is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor should it be relied upon as legal advice for your specific factual pattern or situation.